Probation and Probation Hearings

Many times when people plead guilty or are convicted of crimes they will be placed on probation. In order to be placed on probation, the defendant must be eligible for probation and the crime they are convicted of must allow for probation. The Court decides if someone should be sentenced to probation. Probation is not a right and not all people who are eligible for probation will receive probation.

Probation is an alternative sentence to jail. If an offender is placed on probation, the court will impose conditions that must be followed while on probation. Someone on probation may be required to meet regularly with a probation officer, submit to random drug tests, perform community service, pay restitution, and/or attend counseling. The court can impose many other types of conditions for the purpose of punishment and rehabilitation.

Probation is an alternative to jail. If someone on probation fails to follow the conditions of probation or commits a new crime while on probation, the court may revoke the probation and convert the sentence to jail time. An offender is entitled to a hearing before his probation is revoked. The prosecutor will have to present sufficient evidence that a violation of probation conditions has occurred. Persons who are facing revocation should be represented by and attorney. An attorney can investigate the alleged violations and introduce any helpful evidence that may exist at the hearing. If you need help with any issues related to probation, Ben LaBranche can help.

Contact Ben LaBranche for a free consultation at (225) 927-5495.